Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms

Diagnosing this condition – where the nerves in the body’s extremities (hands, feet, arms, etc) become damaged – is relatively straightforward, although specialist treatment is necessary to both identify the cause and create an effective treatment schedule.

Peripheral Neuropathy can affect the autonomic nerves, the motor nerves, and the sensory nerves. It is not unusual for a combination of different nerves to be damaged which means that symptoms are often quite different/unique between patients. It is also worth remembering that symptoms can worsen and diversify the longer the condition is left untreated.

Autonomic Neuropathy

These symptoms tend to apply to bodily processes that we usually consider to be ‘automatic’ such as the digestive and circulatory system.

Key symptoms include:

  • Nausea, belching & bloating

  • Constipation and/or diarrhea (especially nighttime)

  • Loss of bladder control

  • Low blood pressure (often causing dizziness)

  • Excessive or lack of sweating

  • Rapid heartbeat

  • Difficulty urinating

  • Sexual dysfunction

Motor Neuropathy

Symptoms can present themselves at any age although many people are diagnosed from age 40 and onwards. Pain is the most obvious and common symptom and often begins with quite innocuous issues. These may be constant or periodic, sharp/throbbing/freezing/shooting pains, in specific places or in more general areas. In some cases, pain may take many years to become worse, while in others the decline can be very sudden.

Key symptoms to be aware of include:

  • Muscle weakness and wasting over time

  • Twitching and cramping

  • Numbness that can lead to eventual paralysis

  • Problems lining up the toes (known as ‘foot drop’)

These symptoms often manifest alongside some of those associated with autonomic neuropathy. Sweating incontinence, circulatory issues, dizziness, and heat intolerance are especially common. Quite a significant number of people brush these off as ‘signs of old age’ when the problem is in fact caused by treatable damage to their peripheral nerves.

Sensory Neuropathy

Sensory Neuropathy affects how we experience sensations and can often be extremely uncomfortable. As with the forms we have already discussed, symptoms can appear in milder forms to begin with. These can either rapidly or very gradually worsen over time as the nerves suffer further damage and decline. Distressing as sensory neuropathy most certainly can be, early diagnosis and treatment will go a long way towards successfully overcoming the problem.

Key symptoms to look out for include:

  • Sharp and burning pains (especially in the feet)

  • Numbness and inability to detect changes in temperature

  • Experiencing severe pain from things that should not be painful whatsoever (e.g being brushed with a feather)

  • Loss of balance and coordination

  • Not knowing the position of hands and feet without looking

  • Pins and needles (both consistent and recurring)

Motor Neuropathy

Symptoms can present themselves at any age although many people are diagnosed from age 40 and onwards. Pain is the most obvious and common symptom and often begins with quite innocuous issues. These may be constant or periodic, sharp/throbbing/freezing/shooting pains, in specific places or in more general areas. In some cases, pain may take many years to become worse, while in others the decline can be very sudden.

Key symptoms to be aware of include:

  • Muscle weakness and wasting over time

  • Twitching and cramping

  • Numbness that can lead to eventual paralysis

  • Problems lining up the toes (known as ‘foot drop’)

These symptoms often manifest alongside some of those associated with autonomic neuropathy. Sweating incontinence, circulatory issues, dizziness, and heat intolerance are especially common. Quite a significant number of people brush these off as ‘signs of old age’ when the problem is in fact caused by treatable damage to their peripheral nerves.

Sensory Neuropathy

Sensory Neuropathy affects how we experience sensations and can often be extremely uncomfortable. As with the forms we have already discussed, symptoms can appear in milder forms to begin with. These can either rapidly or very gradually worsen over time as the nerves suffer further damage and decline. Distressing as sensory neuropathy most certainly can be, early diagnosis and treatment will go a long way towards successfully overcoming the problem.

Key symptoms to look out for include:

  • Sharp and burning pains (especially in the feet)

  • Numbness and inability to detect changes in temperature

  • Experiencing severe pain from things that should not be painful whatsoever (e.g being brushed with a feather)

  • Loss of balance and coordination

  • Not knowing the position of hands and feet without looking

  • Pins and needles (both consistent and recurring)

Speak To A Professional Today

Give us a call to schedule your first appointment

(386) 845-3031

Mononeuropathy

It is also worth mentioning the somewhat rarer condition called Mononeuropathy that mostly affects vision and sensation throughout the face/head. If you notice double vision or weakness across the cheeks it could be a symptom for either this or another form of peripheral neuropathy. As with all forms of this problem, early diagnosis significantly increases the likelihood of successful treatment.

HAVE  QUESTIONS?

Our Healthcare Experts Can Help

It is a neck injury that happens when it is bent in a nodding movement violently, for example in a car accident when someone hits you from the back. This injury involves nerves, tendons, disks, and muscles in your neck that need to be monitored to ensure no serious damage was caused. Make an appointment as soon as possible with your doctor.

On average, neck stiffness goes away in a few weeks. When the injury affects only the soft tissue it takes between 6 to 10 weeks to heal. If nerves are damaged it will take longer. Our specialists can help you determine your condition and the best treatment. The earlier you start the easier it is to identify the area to work on. Call us for more information.

Physical Therapy is necessary to build flexibility and strength in the neck muscles. Follow your doctor’s advice on what medication to take to ease the pain. Apply ice to the affected area to avoid inflammation and be aware of your posture to speed the recovery. In case you are told to wear a foam collar, do it even if it is uncomfortable at the beginning. This will prevent you from accidentally hurting your neck again.

The answer is yes because the spine, the neck, and the head are connected through nerves that send messages to the brain when one of them is hurt.
If the pain spreads to your temples, forehead, and around the eyes, it might be a cervicogenic headache. Talk to your doctor to get evaluated.

Locate the painful spot and massage in circles. If you feel a knot push it carefully up and down. You can also try gently stretching your neck and moving it to left and right. Take pain relievers as advised by your doctor. Make sure you do not spend long periods of time in the same posture. If the pain persists for more than three weeks visit a chiropractor or physical therapist.

Call Now

Dr. Matt Smith

Chiropractor
Thank you for your message. It has been sent.
There was an error trying to send your message. Please try again later.

By submitting my data I agree to be contacted

HAVE  QUESTIONS?

Our Healthcare Experts Can Help

It is a neck injury that happens when it is bent in a nodding movement violently, for example in a car accident when someone hits you from the back. This injury involves nerves, tendons, disks, and muscles in your neck that need to be monitored to ensure no serious damage was caused. Make an appointment as soon as possible with your doctor.

On average, neck stiffness goes away in a few weeks. When the injury affects only the soft tissue it takes between 6 to 10 weeks to heal. If nerves are damaged it will take longer. Our specialists can help you determine your condition and the best treatment. The earlier you start the easier it is to identify the area to work on. Call us for more information.

Physical Therapy is necessary to build flexibility and strength in the neck muscles. Follow your doctor’s advice on what medication to take to ease the pain. Apply ice to the affected area to avoid inflammation and be aware of your posture to speed the recovery. In case you are told to wear a foam collar, do it even if it is uncomfortable at the beginning. This will prevent you from accidentally hurting your neck again.

The answer is yes because the spine, the neck, and the head are connected through nerves that send messages to the brain when one of them is hurt.
If the pain spreads to your temples, forehead, and around the eyes, it might be a cervicogenic headache. Talk to your doctor to get evaluated.

Locate the painful spot and massage in circles. If you feel a knot push it carefully up and down. You can also try gently stretching your neck and moving it to left and right. Take pain relievers as advised by your doctor. Make sure you do not spend long periods of time in the same posture. If the pain persists for more than three weeks visit a chiropractor or physical therapist.

Call Now

TALK TO OUR TEAM TODAY

Dr. Matt Smith

Chiropractor
Thank you for your message. It has been sent.
There was an error trying to send your message. Please try again later.

By submitting my data I agree to be contacted

Schedule Your Appointment